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LONS INFANT SCHOOL

Learning, Opportunities, Nurturing, Success (LONS)

  1. Learning
  2. PSHE Curriculum

PSHE Curriculum

 

Reception

Year 1

Year 2

Personal, social and emotional development involves helping children to develop a positive sense of themselves, and others; to form positive relationships and develop respect for others; to develop social skills and learn how to manage their feelings; to understand appropriate behaviour in groups; and to have confidence in their own abilities

Being healthy

Exploring what a healthy lifestyle means

Identifying the benefits of a healthy lifestyle

Identifying ways of keeping healthy

Recognising what they like and dislike

Recognising that choices can have good and not so good consequences

Setting simple goals

Recognising the importance of personal hygiene

Developing simple skills to help prevent diseases spreading

Drug education

Exploring the importance of physical, mental and emotional health.

Exploring how to make informed choices

Understanding the role of drugs as medicines

Identifying alternatives to taking medicines

Identifying that household products, including medicines, can be harmful if not used properly.

Identifying rules for and ways of keeping safe.

Recognising they have a shared responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe

Personal, social and emotional development Self-confidence and self-awareness: children are confident to try new activities, and say why they like some activities more than others. They are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas, and will choose the resources they need for their chosen activities. They say when they do or don’t need help.

Difference and Diversity

Understanding that they belong to different groups

Identifying ways in which they are unique

Sharing opinions on things that matter using discussions

Identifying and respecting the differences and similarities between people.

Being me

Recognising they belong to different groups and communities such as family and school

Exploring ways in which they are all unique

Identify ways in which we are the same as all other people, what they have in common with everyone else

Offer constructive support to others

Identify what makes them special

Managing feelings and behaviour: children talk about how they and others show feelings, talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences, and know that some behaviour is unacceptable. They work as part of a group or class, and understand and follow the rules. They adjust their behaviour to different situations, and take changes of routine in their stride.

Exploring Emotions

Recognising a range of feelings in ourselves and other people

Recognising how others show feelings and how to respond

Recognising that their behaviour can affect others.

Communicating feelings to others.

Developing simple strategies for managing feelings

Using words to describe a range of feelings 

Changes

Exploring what change means

Exploring loss and change and the associated feelings

Exploring the changes of growing from young to old

Managing change positively

Identifying strategies and where to go for help

Making relationships: children play co-operatively, taking turns with others. They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings, and form positive relationships with adults and other children.

Relationships

Recognising our behaviour can affect others

Recognising what is fair and unfair, kind and unkind, what is right and wrong

Listen to other people and play and work cooperatively (including strategies to resolve simple arguments through negotiation)

Offering constructive support and feedback to others

Identifying their special people (family, friends, carers) and how they should care for each other.

Growing up

The process of growing from young to old

Exploring growing and changing and becoming independent

The correct names for the main parts of the body (including external genitalia)

Identifying people who they can ask for help and think about how they might do that

Identifying ways of keeping safe and knowing they do not keep secrets

About privacy in different contexts

About respecting the needs of ourselves and other people

Identifying similarities and differences

What physical contact is acceptable?

That everybody is unique

 

Being responsible

Identifying how they can contribute to the life of the classroom and school

Construct and explore the importance of rules

Explore and understand that everyone has rights and responsibilities

Identify what improves and harms their environments

Recognise what is fair/unfair, right/wrong. Kind/unkind

Money matters

Recognising what money looks like

Identifying how money is obtained

Understanding the ways money can be used

Understanding how to keep money safe and what influences choices.

 

Bullying matters

Recognising their behaviour can affect others

Listening to others and working cooperatively

Identifying that people’s bodies can be hurt

Recognising when people are being unkind to them or others, who to tell and what to say

Identifying different types of teasing and bullying, to identify that these are wrong and unacceptable

Identifying strategies to resist teasing/bullying if experienced or witnessed.

Being safe

Identifying household products are hazards if not used properly

Exploring rules for and ways of keeping safe in a range of situations

Knowing who to go to if they are worried

Recognising that they share a responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe

Exploring what is privacy, their right to keep things private and the importance of respecting others’ privacy

Understanding why rules are important in keeping us safe

Identifying people who work in the community and how to ask for help

 

Key stage one skills

  • Managing my feelings
  • Speaking
  • Sharing
  • Listening
  • Concentrating

Character Education

Reception

Year 1

Year 2

Resilience

Happiness

Citizenship and community spirit

Caring

Moral compass

Truthfulness

British values

Courtesy

Problem solving

Cooperation

teamwork

confidence

self-worth

bravery

Resilience

Flexibility

Friendliness

Citizenship and community spirit

Helpfulness

Honesty

British values

Fairness

Respect

Problem solving

Cooperation

Teamwork

Confidence

Self-worth

Courage

Resilience

Curiosity

Understanding

Citizenship and community spirit

Generosity

Kindness

British values

Tolerance

Problem solving

Cooperation

Teamwork

Appreciation

Confidence

Self-worth

Joyfulness

 

Metagognition

Reception

Year 1

Year 2

Self-improvement

Reflection

Being curious

Continuously improving

Resilience

Cooperative learning

Being resilient

Self-improvement

Continually improving

Cooperative learning

Concentrating

Being creative

Self-improvement

Reflection

Cooperative learning

continuously improving

Being resilient

Concentrating

 

Growth mind-set

Reception

Year 1

Year 2

Different ways to do something tricky

Feelings when things are difficult

Encouraging yourself and others to try again

Identifying challenging things

Setting challenges

Characteristics of mind-set

Growth mind-set

Taking risks

Characteristics of growth and fixed mind-sets

How it feels to fail

How to learn

What happens in the brain when we learn?

Personal challenges

 

Working in specific roles in a learning group

Strategies to help a fixed mind-set

How we feel when we make a mistake

Strategies which help us learn

Effort

Learning challenges

Identifying progress

 

 

PURPOSE OF STUDY

 At Lons Infant School we aim to create a happy, purposeful and supportive environment where children are enabled to become successful learners, develop their full potential and achieve the highest educational standards they can. Our vision reflects a passionate commitment to learning and recognition of the uniqueness of individual learners. It is driven by our desire to offer the best possible education for our pupils in partnership with parents and the local community. We believe a collaborative culture is fundamental in enabling children to develop personally and emotionally, and as young citizens. Children grow up in a complex and ever changing world and are exposed to an increasing range of influences. As a school we aim to build on and complement the learning that has already started at home to provide the knowledge, understanding and skills that children need to lead healthy, fulfilling and meaningful lives, both now and in the future.

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE) are central to a school’s ethos, supporting children in their development, and underpinning learning in the classroom, school, and in the wider community. Values are fundamental expressions of what we think and believe. As a school we encourage children to think about personal and social values, to become aware of, and involved in the life and concerns of their community and society, and so develop their capacity to be active and effective future citizens. Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education equips children with the knowledge, understanding, skills and strategies required to live healthy, safe, productive, capable, responsible and balanced lives. It encourages them to be enterprising and supports them in making effective transitions, positive learning and career choices, and in achieving economic wellbeing. A critical component of PSHE education is providing opportunities for children to reflect on and clarify their own values and attitudes, and explore the complex and sometimes conflicting range of values and attitudes they encounter now and in the future. PSHE education is taught as a planned, developmental programme of learning through which children acquire the knowledge, understanding and skills they need to manage their lives now and in the future. As part of a whole-school approach, PSHE education develops the qualities and attributes pupils need to thrive as individuals, family members and members of society. Further it can help reduce or remove many of the barriers to learning experienced by pupils, significantly improving their capacity to learn and achieve. PSHE education also makes a significant contribution to pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development, their behaviour and safety, and to their emotional wellbeing. PSHE education contributes to personal development by helping pupils to build their confidence, resilience and self-esteem, and to identify and manage risk, make informed choices and understand what influences their decisions. It enables them to recognise, accept and shape their identities, to understand and accommodate difference and change, to manage emotions and to communicate constructively in a variety of settings. Developing an understanding of themselves, empathy and the ability to work with others will help pupils to form and maintain good relationships, develop the essential skills for future employability and better enjoy and manage their lives.

 AIMS

 The overarching aim for PSHE education is to provide pupils with:

  • Accurate and relevant knowledge.
  • Opportunities to turn that knowledge into personal understanding.
  • Opportunities to explore, clarify and if necessary challenge, their own and others’ values, attitudes, beliefs, rights and responsibilities.
  • The skills and strategies they need in order to live healthy, safe, fulfilling, responsible and balanced lives.

During Key Stages 1 learners gradually build on the skills, attitudes and values, knowledge and understanding they have started to acquire and develop during the Early Years Foundation Stage. PSHE education offers learning opportunities and experiences which reflect the increasing independence, and physical and social awareness of learners as they move through the primary phase. They learn skills to develop effective relationships, assume greater personal responsibility and keep themselves safe. It is important to remain flexible as events such as bereavement might require learning to be drawn into Key Stages 1.

 CURRICULUM PLANNING

In key stage one we use Derbyshire county council PSHE Matters document as a basis. Links are made to termly themes and other curriculum subjects where appropriate and these are identified on the termly theme Curriculum Maps and individual Medium Term Plans. Long-term plans identify individual PSHE units taught across the year group phases and follow a two-year cycle. PSHE education is taught by class teachers who take responsibility for planning, resourcing and delivering the PSHE curriculum. Beyond the planned programme for PSHE education, the curriculum provides children with a variety of experiences that have the potential to promote their personal, social development and economic education. These include:

  • Assemblies of Celebration and acts of Collective Worship
  • Circle time
  • Sports clubs and participating in inter-school and county tournaments & competitions
  • Drama and music activities and productions
  • Residential visits and day trips
  • Clubs - singing, drama, art & craft etc
  • Social and fund raising events
  • Theme days/events, for example Community Day, Fairtrade Fortnight, Creative Arts & Culture Week
  • Mini enterprise projects
  • Charity events
  • Leadership opportunities, for example Playground Leaders, representatives on our Children’s Council, Eco-school Committee, PE & Sports Committee

EARLY YEARS FOUNDATION STAGE

Personal, social and emotional development (PSED) is one of three prime areas of learning in the EYFS Curriculum Framework. It involves helping children to develop a positive sense of themselves, and others; to form positive relationships and develop respect for others; to develop social skills and learn how to manage their feelings; to understand appropriate behaviour in groups; and to have confidence in their own abilities.

PSED has three aspects:

Self-confidence and self-awareness: Children are confident to try new activities, and say why they like some activities more than others. They are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas, and will choose the resources they need for their chosen activities. They say when they do or don’t need help.

 Managing feelings and behaviour: Children talk about how they and others show feelings, talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences, and know that some behaviour is unacceptable. They work as part of a group or class, and understand and follow the rules. They adjust their behaviour to different situations, and take changes of routine in their stride.

 Making relationships: Children play co-operatively, taking turns with others. They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings, and form positive relationships with adults and other children.

 SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS

 PSHE education is taught to all children, whatever their ability, in accordance with the school curriculum policy of providing a broad and balanced education to all children. Teachers provide learning opportunities matched to the needs of children with learning difficulties.

 SPIRITUAL, MORAL, SOCIAL & CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

PSHE education gives children specific opportunities to explore the range of attitudes and values in society, and to consider the kind of society they want to live in. Through exploration and discussion of topical political, spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues they develop skills and attitudes that promote:

  • Empathy and a willingness to perceive and understand the interests, beliefs and viewpoints of others.
  • A willingness and ability to apply reasoning skills to problems and to value a respect for truth and evidence in forming or holding opinions.
  • A willingness and ability to participate in decision-making, to value freedom, to choose between alternatives and to value fairness as a basis for making and judging decisions.

PSHE education promotes:

 Spiritual development, through fostering children’s awareness and understanding of issues that involve differing beliefs and values in human society. It helps children develop self-knowledge through an exploration of their identity and belonging, their ideals and commitment and the meaning or purpose they see in life.

Moral development, through helping children to acquire a critical appreciation of issues of right and wrong, justice, fairness, rights and obligations in society. Children have opportunities to explore the ethical and moral dimensions of legal, political, social, economic and environmental issues and to exercise responsibility at a personal and social level.

 Social development, through helping children to acquire the understanding and skills they need to become responsible and effective members of society. They develop an understanding of how society works and how decisions are influenced and made. They take part in community and social activities that help to promote personal and social skills.

 Cultural development, through helping children to understand the nature and role of the different groups to which they belong, to learn about the origins and implications of the diversity in society, and to develop respect for difference. Opportunities to reflect on spiritual, moral, social and cultural dimensions occur through many aspects of PSHE education. Children are encouraged to consider their own views and opinions about them, for example, as they investigate and think about global and topical issues, problems and events, and as they participate in activities in school, in their neighbourhood and communities.

 ASSESSMENT & RECORDING

 In PSHE education there are two broad areas for assessment:

  • Children’s knowledge and understanding, for example, information on health, understanding of rules, understanding of health and safety procedures, and the meaning of ideas including democracy.
  • How well children can use their knowledge and understanding in developing skills and attitudes, for example through participating in discussions, group task and activities, managing conflict, making decisions and promoting positive relationships.

 Assessment in PSHE education should be active and participatory, helping children to recognise the progress they are making in developing and taking part, as well as in their knowledge and understanding. Children should learn to reflect on their experiences, ask questions, make judgements about their strengths and needs, and begin to plan how to make progress and set personal targets. Teachers assess children’s work in PSHE education by making informal judgements as they observe them during lessons and at other times during the school day. Just as in all NC subjects, opportunities for both Assessment for Learning and Assessment of Learning are built into provision. Baseline assessment, in order to understand pupils’ prior learning, is essential to ensure new learning is relevant and progress can be assessed. Assessment should encompass teacher, peer and self-assessment. Progress in PSHE education should be recorded and reported to parents as part of the child’s annual school report.

MONITORING & REVIEW

It will be important to know that our policy is working effectively, and the extent to which it is having a positive impact on the personal and social development of pupils. Judgements will be made on the extent to which pupils are:

  • Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities.
  • Learning to play an active role as citizens.
  • Developing a healthy, safer lifestyle

. · Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people.

 If effectively implemented, this policy will help ensure that:

  • Our practice reflects our commitment towards meeting our aims.
  • Pupils and staff further our aims by contributing towards a happy and caring environment, and by showing respect for, and appreciation of, one another as individuals.
  • The culture and ethos of the school contribute positively to pupils’ personal and emotional development.
  • The curriculum promotes the acquisition of knowledge, and the development of skills and understanding to enable children to make choices and decisions; to develop their own values and attitudes; and to challenge discrimination in any form.



Growing up and changing through Science curriculum.

Circle time - 20 minutes per week.

R-time - 15 minutes per week.